Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
officer, i have almost realtime information as to where shots are being fired right now and where i am going. >> here is how it works. when a gun is firedthe sound is picked up by multiple sensors placed in different locations. each sensor records the exact time it detected the shot. shot spotter uses those times and the distance between each sensor to determine the location of the gunfire. >> gunfire travels a great distance. one or two miles. and if you have sensors far apart, then only the strongest sounds that have gunfire will get to several sensors. >> how did the idea for shot spotter come about? >>ists working at a place called stanford research institute, sri, in mineral park. right next door, we had a very severe gunfire problem and i thought that my expertise in radio wave could be used to show the police exactly where gunfire was. >> this is shot spotter's incidents review center. in. >> reviewers from 40 countries around the world. >> tell me what happens. walk me through it. >> the first task is to look at where that shot took place and what kind of other information he o
. >> so the system is showing real-time impacts? >> basically within a couple of seconds of the impact it comes into the antenna and we can see live what happens to the players. >> you can plot this out through a practice or on entire season. >> we were one of the first teams to limit exposure and practices. we had data saying we are getting really high exposure and practice. the data allowed us to see that. >> in 2011 virginia tech teamed up with youth leagues to research young players as well. >> i don't think anyone expected the exposure numbers that we found. from the first grade to seven, 78-year-old teams, the average impacts is 150 per season per player, some 80 times the acceleration of gravity. again? >> 10-year-old ryan is a young player virginia tech is studying. he suffered a head injury in a running deal. dr mark rogers, a team physician for the hoekies is giving a follow up exam. >> eight to 10-year-olds are getting a lot of hits, some pretty good g-force. gs. >> it's dangerous. >> it's high. a lot of stuff generates changes. they are not doing a lot of head to head conta
a player is hit. player is hit. >> so the system is showing >> so the system is showing real-time impacts? real-time impacts? >> basically within a >> basically within a couple couple of seconds of the impact it of seconds of the impact it comes into the antenna and we comes into the antenna and we can see live what happens to the can see live what happens to the players. players. >> you can plot this out through >> you can plot this out through a practice or on entire season. a practice or on entire season. >> we were one of the first >> we were one of the first teams to limit exposure and teams to limit exposure and practices. practices. we had data saying we are we had data saying we are getting really high exposure and getting really high exposure and practice. practice. the data allowed us to see that. the data allowed us to see that. >> in 2011 virginia tech teamed >> in 2011 virginia tech teamed up with youth leagues to up with youth leagues to research young players as well. research young players as well. >> i don't think anyone expected >> i don't think anyone expected the expos
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)